Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago

Nome, Alaska: Last Train to Nowhere, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

"There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold." -Robert W. Service

A few miles down the Bering Sea from Nome lies a vivid memory of her Gold Rush journey boom to bust. Scattered across the Tundra is a graveyard of locomotive engines that the locals call the “Last Train to Nowhere.”

The trains were built from 1881 to 1886 and were retired engines from the New York Elevated rail system. They arrived in Nome by Steamer in 1903 and were intended for a railway to connect newly sprouted gold mining camps. But as the gold rush faded debts crushed the fledgling railroad and construction soon came to a halt. Today the rusted locomotives lean heavily in the tundra just a few yards from the icy Bering Sea. If you lean into the wind at just the right time you can almost hear the train’s whistle cutting through the air.

Posted 2 years ago

Solomon, Alaska: After the Gold Rush on Flickr.

The landscape surrounding Nome Alaska is littered with the wreckage of its gold rush past. 19th Century Gold Dredges lie in ruins throughout the vast arctic wilderness and tell a silent story of boom to bust. The dredges are so well preserved because they lie in a frozen state for most of the year, revealing their secrets slowly and briefly in a land forgotten by time.

This photo is an HDR shot of 12 images taken in Solomon, Alaska.

Posted 2 years ago

Nome, Alaska: Helios Descends at Midnight, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

This is a second image of the fishing hut on Safety Sound as the midnight sun touches the horizon.

This HDR photo was taken just before midnight on Wednesday July 27, 2011. Nome is located in Northwestern Alaska and lies just below the Arctic Circle so the summer days are long and lingering and summer sunsets last for hours.

The image is an HDR composite of 3 bracketed shots. Safety Sound is a little-known, accessible part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and hugs the coast of the Bering Sea.

Posted 2 years ago

Nome, Alaska: Sunset on Safety Sound, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

A rustic weathered fishing hut greets the midnight sun on Safety Sound, 20 miles east of Nome, Alaska.

This photo was taken at exactly 12am Midnight on Wednesday July 27, 2011. Nome is located in Northwestern Alaska and lies just below the Arctic Circle so the summer days are long and lingering and summer sunsets last for hours.

The image is an HDR composite of 3 bracketed shots. Safety Sound is a little-known, accessible part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and hugs the coast of the Bering Sea.

Posted 3 years ago

Grove of the Giants, Redwood National Park on Flickr.

Grove of the Giants: Redwood National Park, California
March 30, 2011 by Robert Arrington

This photo was taken as we walked among the giant sequoias in the Ladybird Johnson Grove. A part of the Redwoods National Park, these Sequoias have been here since before the time of Christ and are among the oldest living beings on this planet. We humans are finite creatures and nothing reveals our fragility more than these towering sentinels.

“God has cared for these trees, saved them from drought, disease, avalanches, and a thousand tempests and floods. But he cannot save them from fools.” John Muir

Posted 3 years ago
Portage, Alaska: Brown Bear’s Happy Summer, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.I took this shot of a very content Alaska Brown Bear snacking on the green grass of a happy summer in South Central Alaska.

Portage, Alaska: Brown Bear’s Happy Summer, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

I took this shot of a very content Alaska Brown Bear snacking on the green grass of a happy summer in South Central Alaska.

Posted 3 years ago

Prince William Sound Alaska: Above Surprise Glacier, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

Prince William Sound Alaska: Above Surprise Glacier, by Robert Arrington


Deep inside the heart of Alaska’s Prince William Sound and tucked away inside the maze of inlets lies the Harriman Fjord. The early settlers who first explored these fjords must have been surprised when they turned a corner and found themselves face to face with the heaving blue splendor that is today known as Surprise Glacier. I am not quite sure how the glacier got its name but surprise is certainly what was felt when our boat pulled up to the ice to watch the tidewater glacier groan forward and calve icebergs the size of skyscrapers. As we were excitedly watching the drama unfolding before us we heard another sound over our heads. An alpine glacier high up on the mountain above us suddenly broke loose and a massive shelf of ice came crashing down the mountain creating a niagara falls of awesome power and beauty. The boat captain told us that seeing an alpine glacier calve is one of the rarest- and most surprising - sights of all.

This is a photo of the glacier just before she broke loose. See the next few photos in my gallery for the rest!

Posted 3 years ago

Surprise Glacier, Alaska: White Thunder, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

Surprise Glacier, Alaska: White Thunder, by Robert Arrington

Deep inside the heart of Alaska’s Prince William Sound and tucked away inside the maze of inlets lies the Harriman Fjord. The early settlers who first explored these fjords must have been surprised when they turned a corner and found themselves face to face with the heaving blue splendor that is today known as Surprise Glacier. This is a highly active glacier that moves upwards of 30 feet per day in the summer, which creates a huge amount of calving. The photo above is a shot of Surprise Glacier as a massive shelf of ice broke loose and blocks of ice the size of houses came crashing down. The boat was actually 1 mile away from the glacier so perspective is difficult to see. Quite a lot of calving takes place behind the wall of the glacier and it sounds like gunshots firing or the crack of a whip. When a piece of ice crashes into the water it sounds exactly like thunder and the native Alaskans actually call it “White Thunder.”

Posted 3 years ago

Surprise Glacier, Alaska: White Thunder II, by Robert Arrington on Flickr.

Surprise Glacier, Alaska: White Thunder II, by Robert Arrington

Deep inside the heart of Alaska’s Prince William Sound and tucked away inside the maze of inlets lies the Harriman Fjord. The early settlers who first explored these fjords must have been surprised when they turned a corner and found themselves face to face with the heaving blue splendor that is today known as Surprise Glacier. This is a highly active glacier that moves upwards of 30 feet per day in the summer, which creates a huge amount of calving. The photo above is a shot of Surprise Glacier as a massive shelf of ice broke loose and blocks of ice the size of houses came crashing down. The boat was actually 1 mile away from the glacier so perspective is difficult to see. Quite a lot of calving takes place behind the wall of the glacier and it sounds like gunshots firing or the crack of a whip. When a piece of ice crashes into the water it sounds exactly like thunder and the native Alaskans actually call it “White Thunder.”